What is Sogetsu Ikebana?

Sogetsu Ikebana breaks the mold of what ikebana - Japanese flower arranging is. Nature is beautiful as it is, but with a person's vision, its inner beauty can be openly observed. Sogetsu Ikebana promotes the idea that ikebana can be made "anywhere, anytime, by anyone". It does not have cultural or language barriers, but encourages the artist to work within their surroundings and showcase their individuality.

The Sogetsu School was founded in 1927 by Teshigahara Sofu to change the face of what ikebana was at the time. Finding influence from the modern arts of the West, he was able to combine it with distinct Japanese philosophy. Since then, Sogetsu has grown to over 120 international branches, along with collaborate with other art mediums (Noguchi Isamu, Kansai Yamamoto, etc.) shaping the history of "East Meets West".

 
 
Chicks  by Teshigahara Sofu (Founder of the Sogetsu School)

Chicks by Teshigahara Sofu (Founder of the Sogetsu School)

Ikebana as Art 

The three main principles an arrangement should encompass are line, mass, colour. Create a work that showcases all of these things, along with rhythm and movement; to arrange ikebana is like painting with nature. Ikebana can be relatable to music composition, painting or sculpture.  

 
Work by Auralynn Nguyen using only a variety of leaves.

Work by Auralynn Nguyen using only a variety of leaves.

Ikebana as a Philosophy 

To arrange, we use what is near us. We do not seek out materials that are outside of our environment. With ikebana, the concept of "less is more" is applied and requires constant understanding. The art also teaches us about wabi-sabi: the Japanese idea that nothing is permanent, perfect or complete. 

 
Work by Auralynn Nguyen using local materials.

Work by Auralynn Nguyen using local materials.

Your Ikebana, Your Expression 

There are many ways people showcase their individuality, but your mind is constantly progressing. Ikebana is constantly progressing as well. Only you can create ikebana that represents your current state of self.